Discover how to harness the copilot architecture to reengineer your organization’s information assets, empowering collaboration and automation.

Introduction

While Copilot is a powerful tool, its effectiveness in your enterprise depends on how well you prepare your organizational knowledge assets for it to consume and connect to your application landscape for automation.

In this blog post, we will explore the following questions:

  1. What are the types of organizational knowledge that copilot can use?
  2. Where do you store the information, and how do you ensure its quality and security?
  3. How can you leverage Microsoft 365 and custom copilot to create a parent-child hub model for your information assets?
  4. How can you use copilot to transcribe meetings and brainstorming sessions and label them appropriately?
  5. How can you create plug-ins for third-party systems to provide real-time transactional information to the copilot?
  6. How can you build workflows to execute and complete tasks through copilot?

Types of Organizational Knowledge

Organizational knowledge is the collective information and expertise that your enterprise possesses and uses to create value. Copilot can help you access and utilize this knowledge in various ways, depending on the type and format of the knowledge. We can broadly categorize organizational knowledge into three types:

  1. Reference documents rarely change and provide authoritative and reliable information. Examples include policies, procedures, manuals, standards, contracts, etc.
  2. Evolving knowledge: These documents are constantly updated and reflect current knowledge on a topic. Examples include reports, proposals, plans, reviews, feedback, etc.
  3. Real-time transactional information: These are data and events generated by your business processes and systems that provide timely and relevant information on a topic. Examples include sales, orders, invoices, inventory, customer service, etc.

Information Storage and Quality

One of the challenges of using Copilot for your enterprise is ensuring that the information that Copilot consumes is stored in a way that is accessible, organized, curated, and secure. Many enterprises use a common platform for information storage: SharePoint, a cloud-based service that allows you to create and manage sites, libraries, lists, and other content types.

However, simply storing your information in SharePoint is not enough. You also need to ensure that your data is:

  1. Cataloged and labeled: You need to use metadata, tags, categories, and other attributes to describe and classify your information so the copilot can easily find and understand it.
  2. Curated and enriched: You need to review, edit, and update your information regularly to ensure that it is accurate, complete, and consistent.
  3. Information hygiene: To avoid clutter and confusion, you must remove or archive outdated, redundant, or irrelevant information.
  4. Governed: To ensure compliance and accountability, establish and enforce rules and policies for creating, managing, and sharing your information.
  5. Secured: You must protect your information from unauthorized access, modification, or deletion using permissions, encryption, and other security features.

Microsoft 365 and Custom Copilot

One of the advantages of using SharePoint as your information storage platform is that it is part of the Microsoft 365 suite, which also includes other tools and services that can help you leverage Copilot for your enterprise. For example, you can use:

  1. OneDrive to sync and share your files across devices and with copilot.
  2. Teams to communicate and collaborate with your colleagues and copilot.
  3. Power Apps to create custom applications and interfaces for your information and copilot.
  4. Power Automate to create workflows and triggers for your information and copilot.
  5. Power BI to analyze and visualize your information and copilot.
  6. Azure will host and manage your information and copilot in the cloud.

In addition to using the Microsoft 365 tools and services, you can create your custom copilot tailored to your specific needs and preferences. You are using the copilot architecture to train and fine-tune your models and prompts based on your data and scenarios. You can integrate your custom copilot with your existing systems and applications using APIs and connectors.

Transcribing and Labeling Meetings and Brainstorming Sessions

Another type of organizational knowledge that a copilot can help you with is the knowledge that is generated and exchanged during meetings and brainstorming sessions. These are often rich sources of ideas, insights, and feedback that can be valuable for your enterprise. However, they are also usually temporary and unstructured, which makes them hard to capture and use.

Copilot can help you transcribe and label your meetings and brainstorming sessions using the following steps:

  1. Record your meetings and brainstorming sessions using Teams or other tools.
  2. Use copilot to transcribe the audio and video recordings into text.
  3. Use copilot to run a sequence of prompts on the transcribed text to extract and label the critical information, such as topics, questions, answers, actions, decisions, etc.
  4. Use copilot to tag the extracted and labeled information with relevant reference documents, evolving documents, or real-time transactional information.
  5. Use copilot to store and share the transcribed and labeled information in SharePoint or other platforms.

Creating Plug-ins to Third-Party Systems

A third type of organizational knowledge a copilot can help you with is the real-time transactional information generated by your business processes and systems. These are often crucial for your enterprise to monitor and optimize your performance, efficiency, and customer satisfaction. However, they are also often scattered and siloed across different platforms and formats, which makes them hard to access and use.

Copilot can help you create plug-ins for third-party systems using the following steps:

  1. Identify the third-party systems that provide the real-time transactional information you need, such as CRM, ERP, SCM, etc.
  2. Use Copilot to create APIs and connectors to access and retrieve data and events from third-party systems.
  3. Use the copilot to format and normalize the data and events into a standard schema and language that the copilot can understand and use.
  4. Use Copilot to store and share the formatted and normalized data and events in SharePoint or other platforms.

Building Workflows to Execute and Complete Tasks

The ultimate goal of using copilot for your enterprise is to automate mundane tasks and enhance your productivity and creativity. Copilot can help you build workflows to execute and complete tasks using the following steps:

  1. Identify the tasks you want to automate or enhance using copilot, such as writing code, documents, emails, etc.
  2. Use Copilot to create prompts and models that generate the output you need for the tasks, such as code snippets, document sections, email templates, etc.
  3. Use copilot to create triggers and conditions that can initiate and control the execution of the prompts and models, such as time, date, event, user input, etc.
  4. Use copilot to create feedback and validation mechanisms that can check and improve the quality and accuracy of the output, such as tests, reviews, ratings, etc.
  5. Use copilot to create actions and integrations to deliver and use the output, such as saving, sending, publishing, etc.

Conclusion

Copilot is a powerful tool that can help you write code, documents, and other tasks with the help of artificial intelligence. But to make the most of copilot for your enterprise, you need to ensure that your organizational knowledge assets are organized and ready for copilot to consume and can connect to your application landscape to automate mundane tasks.

In this blog post, we have discussed how you can leverage copilot architecture to reengineer your organization’s information assets and enable collaboration and automation. We have covered the following topics:

  1. The types of organizational knowledge that the copilot can use.
  2. The ways to store and ensure the quality and security of your information.
  3. The tools and services that can help you create a hub and spoke model for your information assets.
  4. The methods to transcribe and label your meetings and brainstorming sessions.
  5. The steps to create plug-ins for third-party systems to provide real-time transactional information.
  6. The process of building workflows to execute and complete tasks.

We hope this blog post has given you valuable insights and tips on using Copilot for your enterprise. If you would like to collaborate and have any questions or feedback, please get in touch with us at

https://www.linkedin.com/in/raviraghu
https://www.linkedin.com/in/pardhajasti

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